Tag Archives: intrusion

Common vulnerabilities expose Sara Palin, Bill O’Reilly’s Paying Fans

So again: Palin’s AOL account was hacked because it used publicly-known answers for password-retrieval questions, a common/known exploit exposed users on O’Reilly’s site, and password-reuse by users exposed their other personal accounts.

On September 19, 2008, hackers from the Anonymous collective attacked the website of Fox News host Bill O’Reilly. The hackers found and immediately posted e-mail addresses, passwords, and physical addresses of 205 O’Reilly site members paying $5 a month to hear Bill’s wisdom. The next day, a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack hit the site with 5,000 packets per second. That night, another attack flooded two O’Reilly servers with 1.5GB/s of data.

[…]

The attack itself wasn’t particularly clever, but it was effective. Billoreilly.com’s administrative interface was protected by a servlet that locked down access to all back-end material, but the site administrator made one small mistake: he once created a “New premium member report” showing a list of the most recent subscribers, and he created it in such a way that it bypassed the servlet. As later FBI interview notes show, this was “just an error”—but it made the new member report available outside the secure admin structure to someone who knew the location.

[…]

The attackers took the name at the top of the list, an account registered only one hour before, and used it to log into the O’Reilly site as a check of the data’s accuracy. The information was then posted to Wikileaks and discussed on 4chan. Three O’Reilly members who had used the same password on multiple other sites experienced additional fraudulent use of that information.

The article doesn’t differentiate whether the portion of Bill’s site that was hacked contained cardholder data, so I don’t know if this will be considered a breach meriting PCI DSS penalties.  But it’d be quite embarrassing for Bill if his site now has to post the  “We’ve been hacked!” banner.

via Exclusive: How the FBI investigates the hacktivities of Anonymous.

AnonyOps vs BART

Anonymous computer hackers broke into a BART website and revealed personal information on thousands of BART riders Sunday; part of a protest that could include a disruption of train service during the Monday afternoon commute.

Transit officials closed down the myBART website, which is run by an external vendor, and urged anyone who subscribed to the news alert service to change their passwords on other websites if they use the same password they used for myBART.

[…]

The information includes names, email addresses, myBART account passwords, and in some cases mailing addresses and phone numbers. BART officials emphasized that no financial information is stored in the affected database.

I wonder if the passwords were even encrypted.

via Computer hackers expose BART riders personal information – San Jose Mercury News.

PCI DSS-Compliant Companies Suffer Fewer Data Breaches

According to the study, 64 percent of PCI DSS-compliant organizations reported suffering no data breaches involving credit card data over the past two years, while only 38 percent of noncompliant organizations reported suffering no breaches involving credit card data over the same period. When it comes to overall data breaches (general incident or those involving credit card data), 63 percent of compliant organizations suffered no more than a single data breach, compared with 22 percent of noncompliant organizations. Notably, 26 percent of noncompliant organizations suffered more than five breaches over the same time period.

It is fantastic that taking certain, specific, minimum steps to establish a secure environment actually decreases breaches.

Also notable is the fact that DSS is a private, voluntary initiative with noteworthy results.

“In an era where governments are struggling with the creation of vague yet complex data protection acts, the credit card industry took a bold step toward regulating itself, using plain language, clear goals and a pragmatic focus,” said University of Connecticut School of Business professor Robert Bird. “PCI isn’t perfect—but it succeeded by imposing security mandates and forcing attention on data security, all without government regulation.”

via PCI DSS-Compliant Companies Suffer Fewer Data Breaches: Report – Midmarket – News & Reviews – eWeek.com.

Customer information stolen

‘Twas an exciting and profitable weekend for hackers!

Three database/email server compromises were revealed over the weekend.  A business partner of McDonald’s lost their promotional mailing list, Gawker’s entire user database was compromised and posted, and the DeviantArt user mailing list was also stolen, along with additional user information, again through a partner.  None of these cases involved financial data; none of these would have been covered in any way by the PCI requirements.

[…]

The danger with the McDonald’s and DeviantArt compromises isn’t the account names, it’s the the potential for phishing and other scams.  The phishers now have a validated list of customers they can target their spam at, quite likely starting with fake alerts about the compromise itself to get users to click on links to malicious sites.

Always be cautious about clicking links in email.  If one tells you to go to a site where you have an account, use your own bookmark to get there.

via Network Security Blog » Customer information stolen.

Anton Chuvakin Blog – “Security Warrior”: Verizon Breach Report 2010 OUT!

Watch those faillogs!

“The use of stolen credentials was the number one hacking type in both the Verizon and USSS datasets, which is pretty amazing when you think about it.”“We’ve observed companies that were hell-bent on getting patch x deployed by week’s end but hadn’t even glanced at their log files in months.” [given that password guessing – seen in logs – trumps vuln exploitation by such a wide margin, this should change. Will it? – A.C.]

via Anton Chuvakin Blog – “Security Warrior”: Verizon Breach Report 2010 OUT!.